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View Full Version : Batch 7 is here!...finally something new!


Q-Ball
12-15-2009, 10:32 AM
Finally Charvel gives us something NEW in Batch 7!!! :eusa_clap

Direct mount pickups, a single humbucker, rosewood fretboard, HSS pickups, more chrome, and graphics! :eusa_danc :banana:

:icon_cool The MSRP does remain at $1099 except for the flame graphic models that go for $1199 (yellow) and $1249 (blue).


But ya better get those graphic models fast coz their only making a few. :grumble:


http://i60.photobucket.com/albums/h9/noaccordions/cce304b9.jpg

MapleShredder
12-15-2009, 11:48 AM
Nice !! I'll take that flame graphics Charvel....looking at it production level I'd imagine its well over the $1099 retail price though. :doh:

Stinky
12-15-2009, 12:43 PM
WTF!!!!????:drool2::drool2::drool2::drool2:
I love the natural gold one, and the blue flames!!!
Please guys when you learn anything about the street price tell me!

Q-Ball
12-15-2009, 08:20 PM
Nice !! I'll take that flame graphics Charvel....looking at it production level I'd imagine its well over the $1099 retail price though. :doh:

Amazingly enough...nope! :no: $1199 and $1249 aren't too bad a price for a custom graphic axe. Tho I don't think you'll see these on Ebay in six months time going for $700-800 like the other Production Models :eusa_naug...simply because of supply and demand, with only 125 total flame units available. :eusa_thin

vaguelee
12-15-2009, 11:37 PM
Man that fiesta...
I have to change my pants.

toneseeker
12-16-2009, 06:04 AM
yawn.


I don't get the whole Charvel revival myself. Looks like you could put the same guitar together from Warmoth & ebay. And, there's dudes around that can paint flames for you.

MapleShredder
12-16-2009, 08:42 AM
yawn.


I don't get the whole Charvel revival myself. Looks like you could put the same guitar together from Warmoth & ebay. And, there's dudes around that can paint flames for you.

That is true, but when you get done putting it all together you might as well have a genuine Charvel instead of a copy.

Replica Charvel

Body $125
Neck $200
Floyd (used) $125
2 Humbuckers (used) $100
Hardware $50
Charvel San Dimas neck plate $50
Custom Flame Paintjob $350
_________________________

Total $1,000

toneseeker
12-16-2009, 09:35 AM
I figured it up yesterday.
Single Hum Shredder
Body 50
Neck blank 20
Truss Rod 15
Frets 5
Nut 25
Tuners 50
Fingerboard 20
Floyd 150
Pickup 75
Pot 5
Wire 5
Jack 5
Jack plate 5
Strap buttons 5
Neck plate 10
Screws 5
450

Two pickups
Second pickup 75
Toggle switch 15
540

and, I rounded the numbers up to the next $5.
Then, $350 for a flame job

I would be looking at $800-$890 for it.:thumbs:

toneseeker
12-16-2009, 09:38 AM
That is true, but when you get done putting it all together you might as well have a genuine Charvel instead of a copy.

I guess that's the other part of it, I'd have more fun with a mutt that I have total control over everything that goes in it, than what the factory says I can have. I don't know of too many guitars out there that I wouldn't modify in some way.

MapleShredder
12-16-2009, 09:53 AM
I guess that's the other part of it, I'd have more fun with a mutt that I have total control over everything that goes in it, than what the factory says I can have. I don't know of too many guitars out there that I wouldn't modify in some way.

That is true, there is a fun factor that you really can't put a price on with building your own axe. I love building guitars myself. Assembly and painting them is not enough for me anymore though. That is why I want to start building necks and bodies as I think its gonna be lots of fun.

MapleShredder
12-16-2009, 09:56 AM
I figured it up yesterday.
Single Hum Shredder
Body 50
Neck blank 20
Truss Rod 15
Frets 5
Nut 25
Tuners 50
Fingerboard 20
Floyd 150
Pickup 75
Pot 5
Wire 5
Jack 5
Jack plate 5
Strap buttons 5
Neck plate 10
Screws 5
450

Two pickups
Second pickup 75
Toggle switch 15
540

and, I rounded the numbers up to the next $5.
Then, $350 for a flame job

I would be looking at $800-$890 for it.:thumbs:

I see something missing on this list ! :icon_lol:

How about inlays, cavity covers and the knob(s) :eusa_whis

toneseeker
12-16-2009, 10:25 AM
:doh::bananafli

If we are talking dots to go in a maple neck, I already have that. If we are talking "ahem" black inlays to go in a maple neck, i've still got that. :eusa_danc If I wanted to be a real dick, i'm sure I could find something that would work in a dark fingerboard too, so I wouldn't have to buy it. :icon_lol:

You got me on the knobs and cavity covers,
even though I will probably make the control cover,
and I never put the claw cover on a guitar. :no:

My strat doesn't even have the holes drilled for one. :icon_bigg

axebuilder
12-16-2009, 12:41 PM
by in baulk and it will be even less :icon_wink

Stinky
12-16-2009, 01:31 PM
Some people love the instruments
Some people love the headstocks
and others both
I'm in the 3rd category:eusa_danc

PacerMedic
12-16-2009, 02:50 PM
IT's CHARVEL, bro. WTF do you think Warmoth came from? :eusa_clap

yawn.


I don't get the whole Charvel revival myself. Looks like you could put the same guitar together from Warmoth & ebay. And, there's dudes around that can paint flames for you.

toneseeker
12-17-2009, 05:47 AM
DANG! Busted again. :doh::icon_lol:

The Ground Zero of Hot Rod Guitar

Wayne Charvel was a guitar player in the L.A. area who started a business in guitar repair, including refinish work for Fender under contract in the mid-seventies. Some of his work included routing humbucker cavities in Strats. He started doing customizations that no one had ever done before, and also developed aftermarket parts, including hardware made of aluminum, brass and stainless steel. While doing basic guitar repair and contract work for Fender, he was also making customized guitars that eventually developed into original designs. Soon, he was building custom-made guitars to order and was the only true custom shop on the block.

It was in this shop that a kid named Eddie Van Halen would sit on the floor and tinker with guitars while Charvel did his work. Charvel would eventually offer replacement bodies and necks made by his friend, Lynn Ellsworth. Ellsworth began making Strat bodies and necks under Charvelís tutelage, and then started Boogie Bodies Guitars, a replacement guitar parts company. Charvel sold them at the repair shop. In the late seventies, Ellsworth would partner with Ken Warmoth to create Warmoth Guitar Parts. It was also during this time that Charvel did some work with Dave Schecter, who had begun to make aftermarket guitar parts. Together, they built necks and bodies to be sold through Charvelís mail order service. Later, Schecter would go on to form Schecter Guitar Research, and would design high-end superstrats for discerning players. Eventually, Charvel began making bodies and necks on his own, as Ellsworth and Schecter took what they had learned from him and begin their own luctrative businesses.

Wayne Charvelís guitar repair workshop in Azusa seemed to be the birthplace of the modern hot rod guitar. Eventually, it would become Charvel Manufacturing in San Dimas, Californiaóand would grow into the flagship of the revolution, producing some of the most influential guitar designs to appear on production models to this day. With his staff, he created some of the most original guitar body designs anyone had seen, and had them painted with everything from hot rod flames to asymmetrical stripes and highly detailed graphic artwork. To a guy like me, San Dimas is hallowed ground.

One employee of Charvel became legendary in his own right. Karl Sandoval was a luthier at the Charvel shop and later became known to local L.A. area guitarists as a radical guitar builder. He understood the needs of the working musician as well as the rockstar mentality. His clients included Eddie Van Halen and George Lynch, but Sandoval made more of a statement with his work for Randy Rhoads: the famed polka dot Flying V. Like Ellsworth and Schecter before him, Karl Sandoval had Charvel as a launching pad to elevate his stature in the hot rod community.

toneseeker
12-17-2009, 05:55 AM
Here's the whole article.
They talk about Kramers on page 3.
http://www.premierguitar.com/Magazine/Issue/2009/Feb/The_Return_of_the_Hot_Rod_Guitar.aspx

axebuilder
12-17-2009, 06:27 AM
cool read:thumbs:

Q-Ball
12-17-2009, 10:30 AM
Great article...really cleared up some ancient points for me! :eusa_eh:

What you wood wizards don't realize is some (most) of us don't have the tools, or knowledge, or space, or patience, or time to build our own axes (unless it's on the Guitar Generator :icon_lol:). I think it's outstanding that some people have the where-with-all to start and finish such a complicated project; and to play your finished creation must be orgasmic! :notworthy But for the rest of us a new hot rod Charvel (even if it is from Fender) is as good as it's gonna get. If you don't like something about the guitar, such as pups or the trem, then you can customize the axe and change out those items. :thumbs:

The other aspect of purchasing a finished "name brand" axe is the resale value (hopefully). I still have some comfort thinking my axes are my 401K :eusa_whis:icon_cool

toneseeker
12-17-2009, 11:07 AM
Absolutely, Q ball. :thumbs: If I wasn't into rolling my own, I'd be looking for an old shredder from the 80s.

A big part of why I got into building in the first place, was nobody was/is making exactly what I want. Fortunately, i've always been good working with my hands, and I wouldn't take "you can't do that" for an answer. :icon_lol:

MetalHeadTy
12-20-2009, 04:20 PM
I am GAS-ing one of the sea sick green ones from last time so bad.....I am going to crack soon and get one. even tho you could order all the parts and build it yourself I would love to own a usa charvel (even tho it is fender now)